Not drumming-related but…

In my “other life” I am a Civil War Historian. I have written five Civil War titles to date. I also co-produced and appeared in a half-hour Civil War documentary. I still contribute regularly to the Emerging Civil War blog and copy write for renowned painter Mort Kunstler. I occasionally provide private battlefield tours and speaking engagements. I live within a few miles of four major Civil War battlefields and I am proud to say that two of my books are sanctioned by the National Park Service and carried in their gift shops. I have stepped away from authoring any new Civil War books in order to concentrate on my family but in an effort to promote my work that is not drumming-related; I am providing the synopsis and links below.

The Civil War in Spotsylvania County: Confederate Campfires at the Crossroads BUY HERE

From 1861 to 1865, hundreds of thousands of troops from both sides of the Civil War marched through, battled and camped in the woods and fields of Spotsylvania County, earning it the nickname ‘Crossroads of the Civil War.’ When not engaged with the enemy or drilling, a different kind of battle occupied soldier’s boredom, hunger, disease, homesickness, harsh winters and spirits both broken and swigged. Focusing specifically on the local Confederate encampments, renowned author and historian Michael Aubrecht draws from published memoirs, diaries, letters and testimonials from those who were there to give a fascinating new look into the day-to-day experiences of camp life in the Confederate army. So huddle around the fire and discover the days when the only meal was a scrap of hardtack, temptation was mighty and a new game they called ‘baseball’ passed the time when not playing poker or waging a snowball war on fellow compatriots.

Historic Churches of Fredericksburg: Houses of the Holy BUY HERE

Historic Churches of Fredericksburg: Houses of the Holy recalls stories of rebellion, racism and reconstruction as experienced by Secessionists, Unionists and the African American population in Fredericksburg’s landmark churches during the Civil War and Reconstruction eras. Using a wide variety of materials compiled from the local National Park archives, author Michael Aubrecht presents multiple perspectives from local believers and nonbelievers who witnessed the country’s Great Divide. Learn about the importance of faith in old Fredericksburg through the recollections of local clergy such as Reverend Tucker Lacy; excerpts from slave narratives as recorded by Joseph F. Walker; impressions of military commanders such as Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson; and stories of the conflict over African American churches.

The Angel of Marye’s Heights RENT HERE

On December 13th, 1862, Federal forces suffered terrible casualties in assaults against Confederate defenders on the heights behind the city of Fredericksburg. Although this engagement was tactically insignificant to either side during the Civil War, the actions of Confederate Sgt. Richard Kirkland left a lasting legacy and gave birth to the story of “The Angel of Marye’s Heights.”

Onward Christian Soldier: The Spiritual Journey Of Stonewall BUY HERE

This is a story about faith. A story filled with the kinds of heartache and hardships that would leave many of us questioning our own beliefs. It is a love story that is filled with sorrow, testimony, hope and despair. It is a story that reaffirms the power of prayer and that all things in Him are possible. Ultimately, it is the story of a man who suffered greatly, but chose to embrace the Will of his Savior as the foundation for a legendary life. Onward Christian Soldier presents an intimate portrait of Confederate General Thomas Stonewall Jackson. Unlike the countless military studies that have come before, this inspirational book focuses on both the spiritual and historical milestones in the life of this American icon.

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